Eye tracking detects high pressure inside the skull

Contact: Christine Hill 612.873.5719

Doctors Can Detect Pressure Increases Inside the Skull By Tracking Eye Movements During Watching of Music Videos

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Dr. Uzma Samadani

Eye movement tracking while watching a music video for 220 seconds can reveal whether there is increased pressure inside the skull.  The technology works by measuring the function of the nerves that rotate the eyeball.  “Doctors have known for more than 3000 years that high pressure inside the skull impairs the function of these delicate nerves, and that the first to be affected is usually the nerve that rotates the eye laterally” said neurosurgeon Dr. Uzma Samadani, the lead study investigator.

Participants in the National Space and Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) funded study were 23 patients in the neurosurgical intensive care unit who were awake but had brain problems such as bleeding, trauma, stroke or tumors requiring intracranial pressure monitoring with a drainage catheter.  On 55 occasions the patients watched music videos and Disney film clips while an eye tracking camera measured vertical and horizontal eye movements for 220 seconds.   There was a correlation between increased intracranial pressure and decreased function

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During a recent visit NASA astronaut Kjell Lindgren, MD (who received his medical training at HCMC), was given a demonstration of the eye-tracking technology.

 of the nerves moving the eye as detected with eye tracking.  Decreased lateral eye movements showed the strongest correlation with elevated intracranial pressure, consistent with what has long been known about nerve function.  Individual patients had normal tracking at lower pressures and decreased eye movement at higher pressures regardless of whether the high or low pressure occurred first.

Dr. Samadani, who is the Rockswold Kaplan Endowed Chair for Brain Injury Research at Hennepin County Medical Center as well as an Associate Professor at the University of Minnesota Medical School, noted that concussion and elevated intracranial pressure impact many of the same eye tracking metrics, suggesting that similar pathways may be impaired.

Study results were presented at a joint NASA/NSBRI research group meeting and are now published in the Journal of Neurosurgery.  The company Oculogica Inc has licensed exclusive world-wide rights for commercialization of the technology, for which a patent was issued earlier this month.

NSBRI funded the eye tracking research as a grant to the company Oculogica Inc through the SMARTCAP program which supports commercialization of technologies that will have utility both in space and on earth.  Eye tracking for detection of elevated intracranial pressure could potentially benefit 7 million Americans with hydrocephalus as well as have utility for concussion and other types of brain injury.  One potential indication for eye tracking would be identification of concussed subjects at high risk for second impact syndrome, which is thought to occur after, and further contribute to high intracranial pressure, which can be fatal.

NSBRI has a program investigating technologies for non-invasive monitoring of intracranial pressure which can potentially be elevated during space travel.  Astronauts who experience reduced gravity for prolonged periods of time are at risk for developing headaches and visual problems.  It is thought that without gravity, there is increased pooling of blood in the brain and elevated pressures inside the skull and eye structures.  This risk for elevated intracranial pressure impacts NASA’s plan for prolonged space travel.  Untreated elevated intracranial pressure can lead to cognitive difficulty and vision problems including blindness.  On earth, doctors currently drill holes into the skull to place monitors to measure this pressure in patients with trauma, bleeding in the brain, or certain tumors.  In space, such a measurement is not feasible, necessitating non-invasive measurement.

Dr. Samadani is a founder of the company Oculogica Inc., which is currently applying for FDA clearance for the eye tracking technology, called EyeBox.  She disclosed that she, New York University, the Department of Veterans Affairs and Hennepin County Medical Center all had equity interests in the company.

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Crisis Residence Open House scheduled for May 25

Crisis Residence

Contact: Christine Hill, 612.873.5719

On Thursday, May 25, Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) celebrates the opening of its Crisis Residence located at 3633 Chicago Ave. South in Minneapolis.

The Crisis Residence is the newest addition to the psychiatry continuum of care and will provide short-term intensive treatment for individuals as an alternative to hospitalization or as a transition after hospitalization.

An Open House will take place from 2-6 p.m. on May 25 and will include an opportunity to tour the facility, meet the HCMC providers and staff, and engage with community partners.

Crisis Residence Open House
Thursday, May 25
2-6 p.m. | Open House
4:30 p.m. | Program and Ribbon Cutting
3633 Chicago Ave South, Minneapolis, 55404

Street parking is available along Chicago Ave. To view the full invitation or learn more about the Crisis Residence, visit www.hcmc.org/crisisresidence

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Hennepin EMS, HCMC, Minneapolis Fire Dept. using new system to care for patients with sudden cardiac arrest

First major metropolitan departments in Minnesota to adopt ResQCPR System to improve the likelihood of survival 

Every day, sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), the leading cause of death in the United States, takes the lives of over 1,000 men and women.1 Current survival rates are dismal, with fewer than 10% of patients surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in most communities.1 In Minneapolis, the odds for survival may get better very soon.

Hennepin EMS and the Minneapolis Fire Department are among the first EMS operations in the United States to adopt a new medical device combination, the ResQCPR™ System from ZOLL® Medical Corporation, which was shown in a study to improve survival to one year from out-of-hospital, non-traumatic cardiac arrest by 49% when compared to treatment with conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).2

The ResQCPR System, which was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in March of this year, is the first and only CPR device indicated to improve the likelihood of survival in adults who have experienced non-traumatic sudden cardiac arrest

The ResQCPR System provides intrathoracic pressure regulation (IPR) therapy, which non-invasively improves circulation to vital organs without the use of pharmaceutical or other agents during CPR by enhancing the negative pressure or vacuum in the chest.

“Hennepin EMS along with the Minneapolis Fire Department are dedicated to the citizens of the greater Minneapolis area,” explains HCMC research director and emergency physician Dr. Johanna Moore. “Our adoption of ZOLL’s ResQCPR System is a big step toward improving the odds of survival of cardiac arrest in our community.”

The ResQCPR System is a combination of two medical devices that are used together during CPR: the ResQPUMP® ACD-CPR Device and the ResQPOD® ITD 16. The ResQPUMP is a hand-held pumping device with a suction cup that is placed on the chest during CPR to perform active compression-decompression CPR (ACD-CPR). It is the only CPR device that allows the rescuer to deliver up to 10 kg of lifting force. The ResQPOD ITD 16 is an impedance threshold device (ITD) that prevents the influx of unnecessary air through the open airway during CPR. When used together, these devices create an enhanced vacuum in the chest that improves blood flow to vital organs during states of low blood flow, such as cardiac arrest.

At 10:30am on Thursday, May 4, 2017 Hennepin EMS and the Minneapolis fire Department will offer a demonstration of the device at the City of Minneapolis – Emergency Operations Training Facility located at 25 37th Ave. NE in Fridley.

About Hennepin Emergency Medical Services
Hennepin EMS is an Urban/Suburban 9-1-1 Emergency Medical Services agency that handles approximately 75,000 calls for service each year from the citizens and visitors of Hennepin County, Minnesota.  Hennepin EMS is based at Hennepin County Medical Center in Downtown Minneapolis and serves 14 municipalities within Hennepin County, covering 266 square miles and a population of over 700,000.

 About ZOLL Medical Corporation
ZOLL Medical Corporation, an Asahi Kasei Group Company, develops and markets medical devices and software solutions that help advance emergency care and save lives, while increasing clinical and operational efficiencies. With products for defibrillation and monitoring, circulation and CPR feedback, data management, therapeutic temperature management, and ventilation, ZOLL provides a comprehensive set of technologies that help clinicians, EMS and fire professionals, and lay rescuers treat victims needing resuscitation and acute critical care. For more information, visit www.zoll.com.

[1]American Heart Association

2ResQCPR System Summary of Safety and Effectiveness Data approved by Food & Drug Administration 2015

Copyright © 2016 ZOLL Medical Corporation. All rights reserved. ResQCPR, ResQPOD, ResQPUMP, and ZOLL are trademarks or registered trademarks of ZOLL Medical Corporation or its affiliates in the United States and other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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Posted in HCMC News

North Loop Clinic and Pharmacy opens April 17

North Loop InfoOncall graphic
Open House set for Wednesday, April 26

The North Loop Clinic and Pharmacy, located on the first floor of the Tractor Works Building at 800 Washington Avenue, opens on April 17 in the North Loop neighborhood and central business district in downtown Minneapolis. The clinic is owned by Hennepin Healthcare System, Inc.

“We’re excited to make our health care and pharmacy services available to people who live and work in the vibrant North Loop area,” said clinic medical director Dr. Jane Hess. “We look forward to partnering with our new neighbors to achieve and maintain their health care goals.”

North Loop Clinic was designed to give patients convenient access to the care they need – when they need it – while connecting them to the comprehensive services and expertise available through Hennepin Healthcare System.

The 6,312 square foot neighborhood clinic provides a full range of care for everyone in the family, including family/pediatric medicine, dermatology, allergy, women’s health (certified nurse midwives, OB/GYN specialists), integrative health (acupuncture, chiropractic), laboratory services and a convenient, on-site pharmacy.

“In addition to general dermatologic care, we are also offering cosmetic dermatology at the clinic,” explains Dr. Hess. “Botox, micro needling, cosmetic fillers, chemical peels and other procedures are available, and our adjoining pharmacy will carry a variety of cosmetic products.”

North Loop Clinic and Pharmacy offers same day and next day appointments, as well as evening and Saturday hours. Walk-in appointments and new patients are welcome.

The public is invited to an Open House at North Loop Clinic and Pharmacy on Wednesday, April 26 from 4-7pm. Clinic providers and staff look forward to meeting visitors, and giving tours and health demonstrations. Refreshments will also be served.

North Loop Clinic is the eighth neighborhood clinic to join Hennepin Healthcare System. In 2018, a 325,000 square foot Specialty Center opens on 8th Street across from Hennepin County Medical Center, offering convenient access to many of the hospital’s downtown campus clinics and outpatient services. For more information about North Loop Clinic and Pharmacy or to schedule an appointment, call 612.873.6963 or go to www.hcmc.org/northloop.

 

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Flag-raising ceremony marks National Donate Life Month

donate life 2017
Organ, tissue and eye donations provide renewed hope to thousands of people waiting for transplants each year.  Through the remarkable process of donation, it is possible for a single donor to save or enhance the lives of up to 60 people. Such hope is truly a gift – one made possible by the generosity of individuals who said “yes” to donation and made the decision to give life or sight to those in need.

On Wednesday, April 5, Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) continues its annual tradition of celebrating those who have given and received the gift of life and sight through organ donation. The annual flag-raising ceremony will take place in front of its 717 S. Sixth St. entrance at 9:40am.
DONATE LIFESince completing the upper Midwest’s first kidney transplant in 1963, HCMC’s transplant program has performed over 2,700 kidney transplants, with an increasing percentage involving living donors. In 2010 the first paired exchange transplant in the upper Midwest was completed at HCMC, adding to its 54-year history of “firsts” in transplant care.

HCMC is a Level I Adult and Level I Pediatric Trauma Center and public teaching hospital. The centerpiece of Hennepin County’s clinical health services, HCMC offers a full spectrum of inpatient and outpatient services, including its Transplant Program, which recently marked its 54th year of providing state-of-the-art transplant services.

For more information about organ donation or to register to be a donor, go to http://www.donatelifemidwest.org/mn/.

 

 

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Minnesota Poison Control System: Educate Before You Medicate

Poison Help Logo-NO FRAME MN_PRINT
National Poison Prevention Week is March 19-25, 2017

The Minnesota Poison Control System and Minnesota Commissioner of Health, Dr. Edward Ehlinger, are reminding all Minnesotans that medications can be helpful but must be used and handled with care.

“Poisonings can happen anytime, anywhere, and to anyone,” said Dr. Jon Cole, Medical Director of the Poison Center, “and over half of the poison exposures recorded in Minnesota last year were related to medications.”

The Commissioner has noted that drug-related overdoses have been an issue over the past several years, with 572 deaths occurring in Minnesota in 2015. “Many of these deaths were due to prescription medications rather than illegal street drugs. The fact that this epidemic is not slowing down shows just how important it is to increase awareness of this problem during National Poison Prevention Week,” Dr. Ehlinger stated.

“Health care providers have a responsibility to educate patients about the benefits and risks of any medications. This is especially important in light of rising opioid overdose deaths.”

Man taking prescription pills out of medicine cabinet

While much needs to be done to stop this epidemic, individuals can still make some simple changes. The Minnesota Poison Control System offers these tips for safe medication use, storage, and disposal:

  • Take medications carefully by following label instructions and having your pharmacist or doctor check for potential interactions between prescription, over-the-counter, and herbal medicines.
  • Keep all medications up high and out of sight, preferably locked up.
  • Do not share medications with friends or family members, even if they have been prescribed the same type of medication.
  • Never take your medication in front of children, as they are likely to mimic.
  • Properly dispose of medications. Contact your county government for disposal options.
  • Educate yourself: Learn about poison prevention and Poison Center services. Take the new online training course available at training.mnpoison.org.

At 2:30 PM on Monday, March 20, 2017 the Minnesota Poison Control System is hosting a press conference at Hennepin County Medical Center to address medication safety.

Who:  Minnesota Poison Control System and Minnesota Department of Health Commissioner Dr. Ed Ehlinger
What: “Educate Before You Medicate” Press Conference
When:  2:30 PM, Monday, March 20, 2017
Where: Hennepin County Medical Center, Lower Level, Red Building  (enter at 730 S. 8th Street, Minneapolis)

For questions or concerns about medications, please contact the Minnesota Poison Control System immediately at 1-800-222-1222. Services are free, confidential, and available 24/7. For general prevention tips and materials, follow them on Twitter @MNpoisoncenter or Facebook.

Posted in HCMC News

HCMC’s transplant program marks World Kidney Day

 

On Thursday, March 9, 2017 Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) will partner with the National Kidney Foundation to raise awareness about kidney transplant as part of World Kidney Day. The event is one of many taking place during March, which is National Kidney Month.

Bodner, Jennifer#304
Jenny Bodner, RN

“Chronic kidney disease is described as diminishing kidney function that can be from mild to severe.” explains Jenny Bodner, RN, Certified Clinical Transplant Coordinator at HCMC. “It’s so important to keep these organs healthy. That’s why we’re happy for the opportunity to partner with the National Kidney Foundation to focus on kidney disease prevention as well as providing information about transplant.”

Bodner will answer questions about kidney disease and transplant at the skyway level of AT&T Tower in Minneapolis on Thursday.

Who:   Hennepin County Medical Center’s Kidney Transplant Program

What: Kidney transplant awareness activities, Bernie the Rescue Dog

Where: AT&T Tower, 901 Marquette Ave. Minneapolis, Skyway Level

When: 11AM – 1 PM

Why:   World Kidney Day events sponsored by the National Kidney Foundation

“Kidneys are busy organs, performing many functions that are essential to life- from cleaning out the toxins that build up in our bodies, regulating electrolytes and playing a role in stabilizing blood pressure,” said Bodner.

According to the National Kidney Foundation, in Minnesota alone there are an estimated 400,000 people living with kidney disease, and nearly 9,000 of these are on either dialysis or on the transplant wait list.

HCMC was the first transplant program in the Upper Midwest. Established in 1963, the transplant program has played a vital role in the treatment of chronic kidney disease with kidney transplantation. For more information, go to www.hcmc.org/transplant.

The National Kidney Foundation is the leading organization in the U.S. dedicated to the awareness, prevention, and treatment of kidney disease. For more information, visit www.kidney.org.

worldkidneyday

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