Getting a handle on headache

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It can start as a dull ache – barely noticeable – but by the end of the day you’re clutching your forehead in pain. Most of the time, headaches are a nuisance and nothing to worry about. If headaches disrupt your life on a regular basis, however, they should be discussed with a physician.

Neurologist Kevin Brown, DO, sees many patients with headaches at Hennepin County Medical Center’s Chaska Neurology and Specialty Clinic. “You should consult a physician if you suffer from persistent headaches that disrupt your daily function or are associated with headache “red flags,” he says. Continue reading “Getting a handle on headache”

Grant provides kidney donation education for American Indians and Alaska Natives in Minnesota

Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) has been awarded a Federal Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) grant to develop a theory-based educational program to teach the risks and benefits of living kidney donation (LKD) to Federally-designated American Indians residing in the State of Minnesota.

American Indians and Alaska Natives have a high prevalence of Type II diabetes compared to other racial/ethnic minority group, which means that they also have a high rate of chronic kidney disease (CKD).  Type II diabetes, a leading factor in kidney failure, continues to be a growing concern for the American Indian community. LKD can be a life-saving intervention for people with kidney failure; however, for several reasons, American Indians often aren’t getting the information they need about organ donation. Continue reading “Grant provides kidney donation education for American Indians and Alaska Natives in Minnesota”

Keep cool if you have a chronic medical condition

HCMC physicians are advising that people with chronic medical conditions, like those with heart or lung problems, take extra care to avoid extreme heat conditions.

Chief of Cardiology Dr. Bradley Bart

“While there is no direct relationship between excessive heat and cardiac arrest, heat exhaustion and heat stroke can lead to cardiac arrest requiring CPR and defibrillation in some instances,” explains HCMC cardiologist Dr. Brad Bart. “Patients with chronic cardiopulmonary conditions are put under extra stress when the weather is excessively hot and this can lead to worsening heart failure, severe dyspnea, worsening angina and/or myocardial infarction.”

It’s important to check on elderly friends and family members — and those who have health concerns — when heat advisories are issued. Make sure they stay cool and are drinking enough fluids to stay hydrated.

For more hot weather safety tips, go to www.hcmc.org/outdoors.