Teddy Bear Clinic invites children and their friends to explore HCMC’s pediatric emergency department

Facebook Post
Visiting an emergency department for the first time can be scary – but not on Saturday, May 21 from 8-10 AM when kids are invited to bring their Teddy Bears to Hennepin County Medical Center’s (HCMC) Emergency Department for a special Teddy Bear Clinic.

“The goal of this free event is to expose children to the medical environment before a traumatic situation occurs,” explains HCMC emergency physician Dr. Ashley Strobel. “In addition to preventing trauma, we hope to help children feel more comfortable in this setting and with the procedures that occur during a typical emergency department visit. Allowing Teddy – or any other stuffed animal – to participate demonstrates the friendly nature and loving goal of a visit.”
20160506_hcmc_005
Teddy Bears visiting the emergency department on May 21 will be “admitted” and may have a variety of procedures performed including blood pressure and heart rate checks, injections, stitches, x-rays, or a splint or bandage placed on their paws.

The Teddy Bear Clinic may be a special occasion, but Teddy Bears are welcome in the emergency department anytime. In fact, parents are encouraged to have their child bring their Teddy Bear or any item that will add to their comfort (electronic games, favorite toys, blanket or doll). Continue reading

Posted in HCMC News

Keeping pounds off after weight loss win

Word Help written on a weight scale

How common is it to put the pounds back on after losing weight?
People with a significant weight problem who are highly motivated to lose weight using diet and exercise can almost always succeeded in losing some weight during the initial months of their attempt. If, however, you check with them again five years after starting the diet, about 95% of these people will have regained most or all of weight lost during the initial period.

Can our bodies actually resist losing weight?
Normally, a person’s body has a weight “set point,” that is, a weight at which the body prefers to stay. This set point is not set for all time and can change with life circumstances, including stress and age. At any given time, a person’s body resists change in weight, either gain or loss. When a person tries consciously to lose weight against the body’s desire to maintain its weight at that set point, the body slows its metabolism, so that the person has to reduce food intake much more than one would think in order to lose the desired amount of weight. Interestingly, the same thing occurs with weight gain. When people of healthy weight try, as part of an experiment, to gain weight by eating extra food, their bodies become very inefficient at using the extra food, and most of the additional calories are burned off as waste heat.

What is “resting metabolism”?
Resting metabolism is the rate at which the body uses energy (food calories) when not engaged in physical activity, for example in bed at night. The body reduces resting metabolism and makes more efficient use of food calories when a person diets to lose weight. There is no currently known safe and effective way to increase metabolic rate to help with weight loss. Some weight loss medications increase metabolism, but they only increase it a little, and their effects tend to wear off after about one year of use. In addition, for most weight loss medications, we do not have good evidence that they can be used safely beyond the first one or two years.

Do hormones play a role in weight gain and weight loss?ghrelin and leptin

There are a number of hormones that help the body communicate internally. Leptin helps body fat tissue communicate with the brain. When body fat tissue is excessive, leptin is relatively low. When body fat tissue is too low, leptin increases to tell the brain that the person needs to eat more. GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide 1) helps the intestine communicate with the pancreas about when and how much insulin to secrete. It also communicates with the brain about feelings of hunger and fullness. When the body’s ability to regulate these and other hormones is disturbed, it can result in obesity. There are currently some medications that can help to adjust levels of GLP-1 and reduce weight, but the amount of weight loss is fairly modest. There are currently no medications that help with the leptin system or other hormone systems involved in regulating weight. Weight loss surgery has profound beneficial effects on hormone systems that help the body regulate weight.

How can weight loss surgery help?
After gastric bypass surgery, the average patient loses about 60% of his or her starting excess weight. It is then common to regain a little weight and to settle in having kept off about 50% of initial excess weight. So, if a person needs to lose 100 pounds to achieve healthiest weight, gastric bypass surgery is likely to help her or him lose about 60 pounds over the first year or 2 with a slight regain of weight after that, so that, for the long term, that person’s weight is down about 50 pounds compared with prior to surgery.

Weight loss surgery is much more successful at combating the body’s resistance to weight change than dieting. You might consider weight loss surgery if your body mass index (BMI) is over 40 or if it is over 35 and you have other weight related health problems such as diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, sleep apnea or serious arthritis in weight-bearing joints. A BMI over 40 amounts to about 100 pounds over healthy weight for men and about 80 pounds over healthy weight for women.

People who have weight loss surgery live longer, happier, healthier lives than people who meet the criteria and decide not to have weight loss surgery. People who have gastric bypass surgery are about 40% less likely to die over the next ten years than people who decide not to have surgery. Quality of life studies show that people who have had weight loss surgery are more satisfied with their lives than those who have not. Many health problems, like those listed above, go into remission or at least improve after weight loss surgery.

Weight loss surgery is, therefore, much more effective in helping seriously overweight people lose a substantial amount of weight initially and much more effective in helping people keep the weight off year after year and decade after decade.

Dr. Guilford Hartley is an internal medicine specialist and Medical Director for the Hennepin Bariatric Center. He has worked in the area of adult and adolescent obesity since 1988, focusing on finding the best solutions suited to individual patients’ needs and with emphasis on weight loss surgery for severely obese people as the safest and most effective treatment now available. For more information, go to www.hcmc.org/weightloss.

 

Posted in HCMC News | Tagged , , , , , , , ,

HCMC Clinic and pharmacy to open in North Loop area of downtown Minneapolis

North Loop Twitter graphicHennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) will open a new clinic and pharmacy to serve people living and working in the North Loop area and central business district in downtown Minneapolis.

“North Loop is the fastest growing residential neighborhood in Minneapolis and the people who live there have been asking for a local clinic and pharmacy to serve their health care needs,” said Jon L. Pryor, MD, MBA, CEO. “This new clinic will do that, and serve a broader need for several sought-after specialties for people who live and work in the area.”

The new clinic and full service pharmacy will open later this year on the first floor of the Tractor Works building at 800 Washington Avenue North.

“This is an active neighborhood and this clinic will provide convenient access to primary care, chiropractic care and acupuncture services that neighborhood residents told us they want,” said Scott Wordelman, FACHE, Sr. Vice President of Ambulatory Care & Support Services. “We will also offer allergy and dermatology specialty care by board-certified physicians, as well as additional specialties, such as women’s health and sports medicine.”

The clinic will blend high tech and high touch, with top medical care and conveniences like online scheduling, personal electronic medical records and wellness, nutrition, and fitness programming for the neighborhood.

“Our mission is to improve the health and wellness of the whole community and this clinic, along with the rest of our growing clinic system, supports that mission,” said Pryor.
HCMC recently announced the move and expansion of the Richfield Clinic, scheduled to open in a larger, more visible location in Richfield this fall. In downtown Minneapolis, HCMC operates an employer clinic and multiple primary care and specialty clinics on the main medical center campus. Construction also is underway on a new 377,000 square foot ambulatory clinic and surgery center that will open in early 2018.

“Between the new North Loop Clinic and our main campus we are able to meet every health care need of downtown residents, workers, and visitors,” said Wordelman. “People can stay in one system to get the full continuum of care, and it’s all located close to where they live or work.”

 About Hennepin County Medical Center

Hennepin County Medical Center is a health care system that includes a nationally recognized Level I Adult and Pediatric Trauma Center with the largest emergency department in Minnesota. The comprehensive health care system includes a 484-bed acute care hospital, primary care and specialty clinics located in Minneapolis in the Whittier, East Lake St., and Elliot Park neighborhoods and in the suburban communities of Brooklyn Center, Brooklyn Park, Golden Valley, Richfield, and St. Anthony Village. HCMC also offers home care and hospice services. HCMC is operated by Hennepin Healthcare System, Inc., a subsidiary corporation of Hennepin County.  More information at hcmc.org.

Posted in HCMC News, HCMC Press Releases | Tagged , , , ,

Late business leader Pat Fallon supports brain injury research at HCMC

The late Twin Cities advertising executive Pat Fallon left a bequest supporting traumatic brain injury research at Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC). The Hennepin Health Foundation today announced a major gift from Pat to support the Rockswold Kaplan Chair for Traumatic Brain Injury Research at HCMC.

Fallon’s son, Duffy, was treated by HCMC in 2011 for a brain injury as a result of a hockey accident. At the time, Pat Fallon said they’d had a series of medical appointments elsewhere that brought little progress and a lot of frustration. “Our world changed once we got to HCMC’s Traumatic Brain Injury Center. Instead of telling him what he couldn’t do, the doctor said, ‘Duffy, I can help you.’’’ Today, Duffy has recovered fully and is a student at Boston College. Continue reading

Posted in HCMC News, HCMC Press Releases | Tagged , , , , ,

SAFE KIDS Day – Saturday, April 16 at Whittier Clinic

Hennepin County Medical Center Join Safe Kids of Hennepin County, Local Children and Families on SafeKidsDay to Take Action to Keep Kids Safe from Preventable Injuries

Safe Kids of HeBernie onlynnepin County along with the Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) Children’s Literacy Program, HCMC Whittier Clinic, Minneapolis Police Department, and community volunteers will host a family event at the HCMC Whittier Clinic located at 2810 Nicollet Ave Minneapolis, MN 55408  on Saturday, April 16, 2016 from 10:00 am- 11:30 am. 

One of the day’s events includes HCMC’s mascot, Bernie the Rescue Dog, and a few of his friends who will host an educational session about how to be safe around dogs.

Mandy Jasperson knows firsthand the importance of being aware of potential safety risks around pets — especially ones you don’t know. Her 2-year-old daughter, Chelsea, was attacked and bitten by a dog at a friend’s house in February. Chelsea continues to recover but will require additional surgery.

“It was awful,” she explains. “It was so unexpected and happened so quickly. I don’t want anyone to have to see their child get injured like this.”

Jasperson and her daughter will be attending the Safe Kids Day and will be available for interviews.

Other highlights of the Safe Kids Day event include:

  • The HCMC Children Literacy Program will be reading the book Officer Buckle and Gloria by Peggy Rathman, which includes great safety messages, to the kids.
  • Kids and their families will attend several safety stations and learn about home safety, poison prevention in the laundry room (laundry packets), the safest way to ride in a car, and fire and pedestrian safety.
  • Games, prizes, free books, and lots of great information for parents and caregivers on how to keep their kids active, healthy, and safe.

“Safe Kids Day has one simple, but critical goal: working together as a community to raise awareness about preventable injuries so kids can grow up to do all the great things kids were meant to do,” says Julie Philbrook, HCMC Safe Kids of Hennepin County Chapter Director “This is a day to take action to make every kid a safe kid.”

Safe Kids Day is presented by Nationwide® and supported by Johnson & Johnson, FedEx, Chevrolet, Kidde and Tide. For more information, visit https://www.safekids.org/safekidsday.

 

 

Posted in HCMC News

Ford W. Bell, DVM named Vice President of Philanthropy/Community Relations at HCMC

bell-ford-lg

Ford W. Bell, DVM

Ford W. Bell, DVM has been named vice president of philanthropy/community relations of Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) and president of the Hennepin Health Foundation. Dr. Bell has been serving as interim president of the foundation since August. Under his interim leadership, the foundation hosted its most successful fundraising gala ever this past December, both in attendance and funds raised. Earlier this month, the foundation announced receipt of a $4.6 million gift and grant from the Delta Dental Foundation of Minnesota that will expand access to dental services in HCMC’s new clinic and specialty building currently under construction.

“The Hennepin Health Foundation provides a way for individuals, corporations, and foundations to support the vital mission of HCMC,” said Jon L. Pryor, MD, MBA, CEO of Hennepin Healthcare System. “Ford Bell is a dynamic and visionary leader who will help the foundation grow to support HCMC as we continue to develop new and innovative approaches to meeting the needs in our community.”

Dr. Bell has broad experience as a national and Twin Cities nonprofit executive. From 2007 until last May, Dr. Bell served as president of the American Alliance of Museums in Washington, D.C. Prior to 2007 he had a distinguished career as a veterinarian and non-profit executive, including service as President and CEO of the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation. He is a past chair of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts board, and has served on the board of the Bell Museum of Natural History at the University of Minnesota and the Greater Minneapolis Council of Churches.

The Hennepin Health Foundation connects the generosity of the community to the mission of HCMC which is to ensure access to outstanding care for everyone, while improving health and wellness through teaching, patient and community education and research. HCMC is a nationally recognized Level I Adult Trauma Center and Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center with the largest emergency department in Minnesota. It is operated by Hennepin Healthcare System, Inc., a subsidiary corporation of Hennepin County. The comprehensive academic medical center and public teaching hospital and clinic system includes a 484-bed acute care hospital, primary care and specialty clinics located in Minneapolis and surrounding suburban communities, as well as home care and hospice services.

Posted in HCMC News, HCMC Press Releases | Tagged , , , ,

National Poison Prevention Week, March 20-26

MN Poison Control System and Safe Kids MN Highlight Risks and Tips for Child Safety

Poison HelpIn support of National Poison Prevention Week, March 20-26, the Minnesota Poison Control System and Safe Kids Minnesota are reminding parents and caregivers that children are at risk and offer practical suggestions to keep them safe.

“Poisonings can happen anytime, anywhere, and to anyone,” said Kirk Hughes, education director and poison specialist with the system’s Poison Center, “and last year nearly half of the poison exposures recorded in Minnesota were among children under the age of six.”

Pills can help with concentration

Despite the relatively high poisoning risk to children, it’s not on the radar for most parents. “Recent research from Safe Kids Worldwide found that only 4% of parents expressed concerns about poisoning, compared to other injury hazards in the home,” said Erin Petersen, coordinator of Safe Kids Minnesota.  Safe Kids has also found that parents’ and grandparents’ medications are a key culprit in child poisonings, accounting for 77 percent of children’s poison-related emergency room visits, according to another research report.

To prevent these incidents, the Poison Center and Safe Kids Minnesota offer simple, potentially life-saving tips:

– Program the nationwide Poison Help number (1-800-222-1222) into your cell or home phones.

– Keep medicines and household products in their original containers.

– Keep all medicines and household products up high and out of sight or locked up. If visitors are expected in your home, make sure suitcases and purses are stored out of children’s reach; remind visitors to take responsibility for their own medications.

– Take the time to read and follow the label before taking or giving medicine.

Key Facts About the Minnesota Poison Control System

Anytime, anywhere, anyone can call the Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222.

Anytime: The Poison Center Emergency Call Center is available 24/7/365. It’s free and confidential.

Anywhere: In 2015, the Poison Center managed over 47,000 calls statewide from homes, schools, workplaces, and health care facilities statewide.

Anyone can call for help managing poison emergencies including; parents, caregivers, community members, emergency medical personnel, nurses, and physicians.

The Poison Center saves lives and money throughout Minnesota. Every dollar spent on Poison Center services saves over $13 in unnecessary medical costs. Ninety-two percent of exposures in the home are safely managed at home with expert consultation.

Visit www.mnpoison.org or www.safekids.org/medicinesafety  for more prevention tips, educational resources, and downloadable materials. Follow The Poison Center on Twitter @mnpoisoncenter or on Facebook.

The Minnesota Poison Control System is located at Hennepin County Medical Center. The Poison Center is designated by the Minnesota Department of Health to provide poison information and consultative services to the entire State of Minnesota.

Safe Kids Minnesota works to prevent unintentional childhood injury, the leading cause of death for children and teens. It is a member of Safe Kids Worldwide, a global network of organizations dedicated to preventing unintentional injury. Safe Kids Minnesota was founded in 1988 and is led by the Minnesota Safety Council. For more information, visit www.safekids.org or www.minnesotasafetycouncil.org/safekids.

 

Posted in HCMC News, Hennepin Regional Poison Center | Tagged , , ,