Internationally recognized neurosurgeon Dr. Uzma Samadani joins HCMC

SAMADANI_UZMA_photoDr. Uzma Samadani, whose research on concussion recently made headlines around the world, is joining the Department of Neurosurgery at Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC), a nationally recognized Level I Adult and Pediatric Trauma Center that specializes in the treatment of traumatic brain injuries. She will serve as the Rockswold Kaplan Chair for Traumatic Brain Injury Research, and also be appointed an Associate Professor of Neurosurgery at the University of Minnesota. Continue reading

Partnership fills food and nutrition needs during summer months

Hennepin County Medical Center and Open Your Heart to the Hungry and Homeless Announce Sixth Annual Food Shelf Challenge Grant

The Hennepin Health Foundation of Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) and Open Your Heart to the Hungry and Homeless announce the Sixth Annual Food Shelf Challenge Grant. Open Your Heart to the Hungry and Homeless will proportionally match donations to the Food Shelf @ HCMC during the month of July, up to $5,000. In 2014, Minnesota food shelves raised over $1,000,000 with this grant and hope to raise even more this year. Continue reading

U of M wrestlers visit 8 y.o. wrestler grappling with burns

Tyler Schultz’ wrestling teammates in South Dakota are pulling for his speedy recovery – but a little extra “muscle” can’t hurt!

On Monday, Jumeetingne 15, four members of the University of Minnesota’s Golden Gopher Wrestling Team stopped by to meet Tyler and offer encouragement as he receives treatment for 3rd degree burns in Hennepin County Medical Center’s (HCMC) Burn Center.

Sam Brancale, Josh Shupe, Zane Zeman and Nate Thomas brought Tyler a poster signed by the entire team and visited with the young wrestler and his parents. The event was covered by WCCO 4 News sports reporter Dave McCoy and aired Tuesday, June 16.

Tyler and Gopher Group

Sam Brancale, Josh Shupe, Zane Zeman, Tyler Schultz, Nate Thomas

Angie Whitley and Tyler

Angie Whitley and Tyler

“He’s such a strong kid and he’s made remarkable progress,” explains Angie Whitley, RN, one of the many nurses Tyler has won over during his 45-day stay at HCMC. “Having these wrestlers take time out of their busy schedules to stop by and visit Tyler is so very much appreciated – and I think they enjoyed it, too! Encouragement and hope is a vital part of the healing process for patients recovering from burns.”

In a few weeks, Tyler (who wrestles at 50 pounds) heads back to his hometown near Aberdeen, SD soon where he’ll continue therapy on an outpatient basis.

Eden Prairie’s Sam Brancale (junior) wrestles at 125 and 133 lbs. Josh Shupe (senior) from Marshfield, WI, wrestles at 141 lbs. Nate Thomas (sophomore) is from Mantorville, MN and wrestles at 133 lbs. Zane Zeman (junior) is from Avon, Ohio and wrestles at 157 lbs.

(Left to right) Nate Thomas (sophomore) is from Mantorville, MN and wrestles at 133 lbs. Josh Shupe (senior) from Marshfield, WI, wrestles at 141 lbs. Eden Prairie’s Sam Brancale (junior) wrestles at 125 and 133 lbs. Zane Zeman (junior) is from Avon, Ohio and wrestles at 157 lbs.

Pinwheels for Prevention Award given to Mother-Baby Program

Hennepin County Medical Center’s (HCMC) Mother-Baby Program‘s Day Hospital was recently recognized for its commitment to the prevention of child maltreatment through collaborative public, private, non-profit and local services effort by the Minnesota Communities Caring for Children (MCCC).

The Mother-Baby Program opened in 2013. It was the first program of its kind in Minnesota, offering a range of mental health services to support women and families.

Each year, MCCC presents these Pinwheels for Prevention awards to community leaders in an effort to raise awareness about their innovative programs and to encourage continued investment in prevention and family strengthening efforts statewide. The pinwheel is a national symbol of child abuse and neglect prevention awareness. Over 225 Pinwheel Awards have been presented since 2003. Continue reading

Countdown to NASA launch begins with HCMC-trained astronaut aboard

UPDATE: Dr. Kjell Lindgren’s launch to the International Space Station (ISS) was delayed after a problem occurred involving an unmanned cargo spacecraft delivering supplies to the ISS.  The investigation into what caused the problem is now completed – and the ISS launch has been rescheduled for July 22!

Dr. Kjell Lindgren credits his emergency medicine training at HCMC to preparing him for his space launch.

16101545838_76bedf4c47_zStaff at Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) in Minneapolis are counting down the days until the launch of Expedition 45 crew members to the International Space Station in July when they’ll see their student, colleague and friend fulfill his dream of space travel.

NASA astronaut and former Chief Emergency Medicine Resident Dr. Kjell Lindgren will take his medical and aerospace training with him aboard a Soyuz spacecraft that will fly from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan to the International Space Station on Tuesday, May 26, 2015. Dr. Lindgren and his Expedition 45 colleagues will remain on the Space Station until November 2015.

Dr. Lindgren completed his residency in Emergency Medicine at HCMC in 2005, where he appreciated the opportunity to train in a Level I Trauma Center with one of the most sought-after programs in the country. He is currently assigned as a flight engineer with Expedition 44/45.

“The training I received in the HCMC Emergency Medicine residency program provided me with a suite of skills that I still use today,” explains Dr. Lindgren.

In fact, he thinks it’s great training ground for spaceflight.

“The environment can be stressful, teamwork is critical, the job can be mundane one moment and high stakes the next, the breadth of knowledge required is intimidating, and the coffee is not always great.”

Hennepin County Medical Center is a nationally recognized Level I Adult Trauma Center and Level I Pediatric Trauma Center with the largest emergency department in Minnesota. The comprehensive academic medical center and public teaching hospital includes a 472-bed acute care hospital as well as primary care and specialty clinics located in downtown Minneapolis its surrounding communities.

See YouTube video about Dr. Lindgren and his crew.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

20 Surprising Reasons to Have Your Baby at HCMC


1. HCMC became a Baby-Friendly Hospital in February 2015, which means we are among a group of hospitals that are nationally recognized as centers of excellence in maternity care practices and infant feeding.

Bullet-1

2. It’s your choice. At HCMC, prenatal care and deliveries are done by OB/GYN and Family Medicine Physicians as well as Nurse-Midwives.

Bullet-2

3. Providing care that is centered around the needs of your family is the guiding principle at the HCMC Birth Center. We pledge to work with you…not on you…to provide a birth experience that is unique and memorable for your family.

Bullet-3-Option-2

 4. Mothers and babies room together throughout the entire hospital stay so they can spend their first days together as a family.

Bullet-4
5. HCMC is one of the first Minnesota hospitals to provide skin-to-skin contact immediately following both vaginal and cesarean births.

Bullet-5

6. The Nurse-Midwife Service was the first of its kind in Minnesota, and has been welcoming new babies since 1971.

Bullet-6

7. Any patient who wants one has access to a Doula (certified labor support person).

Bullet-7

8. Premature or very sick infants are cared for in the state-of-the art Newborn Intensive Care Unit.

Bullet-8-Option-2

9. Learn what to expect when you are expecting. You and your family can take a wide range of classes — from childbirth, to car seats, to breastfeeding, and more.

Bullet-9-Option-2

10. Experience your pregnancy and prenatal care in a group setting with other expectant mothers. In our CenteringPregnancy® program, groups of 8-12 women are seen together throughout their entire pregnancies.

Bullet-10

11. It is very common to feel sad or anxious when you are pregnant or parenting young children. The Mother-Baby Program offers support for mothers’ emotional health.

Bullet-11

12. Interpreter services are provided in 20 different languages, free of charge, to limited and non-English speaking patients.

Bullet-12

13. As Minnesota’s premier teaching hospital, HCMC is home to the largest maternity care teaching site in the Midwest so you can expect expert and innovative care.

Bullet-13

14. The Breastfeeding Clinic is staffed by Internationally Board Certified Lactation Consultants. Call (612) 873-MILK for breastfeeding advice. Inpatient Breastfeeding support is available 7 days a week!

Bullet-14-Option-2

15. The Birth Center has many options for increasing your comfort during labor from birthing balls to soothing tubs and music that you love. There are many choices!

Bullet-15

16. HCMC is among the state’s top performers for having the lowest Caesarean section rates according to MN Community Measurement. We are also experts in helping you have a vaginal birth after you’ve had a Caesarean.

Bullet-16

17. Your community physician may have trained at Hennepin. In fact, we are home to the largest maternity care teaching site in the Midwest so you can expect the most expert and innovative care.

Bullet-17-Option-2

18. The Birth Center continues to offer water birth for Nurse Midwife patients, and we also have tubs in the Labor and Delivery unit for moms who want them to help increase comfort in labor.

Bullet-18

19. The OB Testing unit is a special department for patients with high-risk pregnancies. Our maternal/fetal medicine physicians will diagnose and carefully monitor moms to ensure the best outcomes possible.

Bullet-19-Option-2

20. HCMC has special classes for big brothers and big sisters, ages 2-10, to help them prepare for a new baby in the family.

Bullet-20

Delivering more than 2,200 babies each year, The Birth Center at Hennepin County Medical Center is expertly equipped to meet all of the patients’ needs before, during and after the arrival of their child. Hennepin County Medical Center recognizes that the birth of a child will be one of the most exciting times in a patient’s life and provides a full spectrum of care which can be customized to meet patient needs and desires. From an advanced neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to a nurse-midwife unit, a full spectrum of options is available for families. Call 612-873-BABY (2229) for more information.

Photo Credit: #2 and #16 Megan Crown; #18 Sarah Hrudka

Removing clots provides additional benefits for stroke patients compared to medications alone

HCMC patients enrolled in study that shows clot-busting medications aren’t the only options in stroke care

Rick and BearTaking his dog out for a walk left Richard Juergensen speechless – but thanks to a life-saving technique and the quick actions of a neighbor, the 55-year-old survived a stroke and is already back to work.

On the chilly -8 below evening of Tuesday, March 4, Juergensen and his chocolate lab, Bear (see photo) began their evening routine going outside for a walk. After Bear made a pit stop in the front yard, Richard remembers his arm suddenly going numb. “I grabbed hold of my arm and it was just kind of flopping around,” he explains. “Then my right leg went numb, too. A neighbor saw me and asked me what was wrong, but I couldn’t answer him. I knew what I wanted to say, but couldn’t say it.”

His neighbor quickly called 911 and Hennepin EMS paramedics recognized his symptoms as a likely stroke so notified the hospital of a “Stroke Alert” and transported him to Hennepin County Medical Center, where he was evaluated by their stroke team. “When I was in the emergency department I felt like giving up because people were asking me questions and I knew the answers, but couldn’t articulate them,” said Juergensen. “It was very scary.”

He was found to have an occlusion – a clot – in one of the branches of the middle cerebral artery in his brain and was immediately taken to an interventional radiology suite, where the clot was removed using a Solitaire™ stent retriever and a special suction device called Penumbra™. Because Juergensen was on blood thinners, he could not receive the clot-busting medication, alteplase (also known as tPA), leaving him mechanical thrombectomy as his only treatment option.

“As the only Minnesota hospital to enroll patients in any of four recent research studies about whether clot removal using state-of-the-art devices is as beneficial as IV tPA, we were in a perfect position to treat Mr. Juergensen,” explains HCMC’s Dr. Bharathi Jagadeesan. “The research trials demonstrated that this technique works, and that clot-busting medication isn’t the only answer.”

In fact, if mechanical thrombectomy (blood clot removal) is performed, patients have a longer window of time to receive treatment and more patients have a good outcome when compared to clot-busting medication therapy alone.

“IV tPA, or clot-busting medication, is still our first-line therapy; however, it must be administered within 4.5 hours of the onset of stroke symptoms and is not safe in patients with a significant bleeding risk, like Mr. Juergensen,” said Dr. Jagadeesan. “So if the patient cannot be given IV tPA or if stroke symptoms persist after tPA is started, it’s great to know that we have the specialized equipment and highly skilled interventional team that are needed to successfully perform mechanical thrombectomy.”

“When I woke up Wednesday morning, everything was back to normal,” said Juergensen. The night before I thought my life was changed forever. Now words can’t express how grateful I am for the care I received.”

Juergensen was discharged from HCMC on March 6, just 3 days after having what would most likely have been a major stroke if he hadn’t received emergency treatment. He returned to work a week later.

“Mr. Juergensen is an excellent example of the life-saving and life-changing outcomes that can be achieved with prompt and precise medical intervention,” said Dr. Jagadeesan.

The Hennepin Stroke Center at Hennepin County Medical Center is a national leader in the treatment of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes with some of the fastest clot-busting drug delivery times in the U.S. HCMC is the only hospital in Minnesota who enrolled patients in the SWIFT-PRIME stroke trial which demonstrated improved outcomes in patients receiving IV tPA plus cutting edge endovascular therapy compared to patient’s receiving IV tPA alone. The Hennepin Stroke Center is nationally certified by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) for rehabilitative care after a stroke occurs.